A theme song for John Galt aka Joe the Plumber

Update: Sunday 18 June 2017

This has clearly not well weathered the two transitions from its original creation. It will be fixed.

 

Saturday, October 18, 2008

 

 

 

 

 

 

Saturday, October 18, 2008

Thanks to Kevin over at Queer Conservative for giving the link to this.

 

He’s got a great blog full of cool widgets of which this is but one. And he kindly posted a link to his source, sharing the wealth as it were.

U-Roy, Natty Rebel.

’Stead of fussin’ an’ fightin’, Why not let’s get together and live in one love and one I-netty. Ya know? Rebel in the mornin’, Rebel in the evenin’, too

 

I’d say I’s the great adventurer.

 

Can you hear what I’m sayin’? Let there be love.

 

See the mornin’ sun on the hillside.

 

Nothin’ in this world they could I never do

Never never do stop Natty Dred from livin’ up, ya

Said now I’m a livin’ man an’ I got me lotta work to do.

 

Nothing they could ever do could stop Natty Dred from steppin’ on higher and higher and higher, achievin’ zing-zing

 

Rebel in the mornin’, rebel in the evenin’, too

Got me Jah-Jah’s works to do

 

It means that I got to get steppin’.

 

Some of the lyrics. Admittedly anglicized ’cause I can’t cut through the patois.

 

Man, every time I hear the “mornin’ sun… got me lotta work to do” riff I get all verklempt. On particularly susceptible days, I get all teary.

 

It’s an anthem for John Galt because it speaks to the indomitable spirit of man living according to his values and asking only that he be allowed to in the face of overwhelming resistance, thus:

 

“Nothin’ in this world they could I never do

Never never do stop Natty Dred from livin’ up, ya

Said now I’m a livin’ man an’ I got me lotta work to do.

 

Nothing they could ever do could stop Natty Dred from steppin’ on higher and higher and higher, achievin’ zing-zing”

 

Now, I am no expert in the ghetto-inspired patois of 1970’s Kingston, Jamaica, but I take “achievin’ zing-zing” to be a device indicating achieving that to which he is aspiring. That is why it is, at heart, the drive behind Joe the Plumber’s original question.

 

 

 

This is from 1976, or so. Unfortunately, or paradoxically, I heard it for the first time a few years ago, but it pretty much echoes my ethos. Be that as it may, I think it is a particularly American expression of values. Like the lyrics in much of the early reggae c. 1970-79. “They say it’s easier for a killer to go through the eye of a needle than for an honest man to enter in the kingdom of heaven. Every one will be judged according to the work they do, so do good and good will follow you.” (Delroy Wilson, “Do Good”, c. same time frame). It’s deeply spiritual and teaches the wisdom of the ages. I know its truth, but understand it from a zen-capitalist’s perspective. I’ve learned many of these lessons the hard way. But I digress. I just regret not having heard it earlier as it gives me strength. It has helped in my understanding of Zen, too. In terms of understandingsynchronicity, and the Universe’s propensity to give one a kick in the ’nads every now and then.

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